School GrantsGovernment Grants

Resources to Acquire US Government Grants

Finding and identifying U.S. Government agencies that give grants for specific purposes or in specific subject areas requires time, effort, and research. The resources on this page provide a starting point to help you do your own research.The first place you should look is the Grants.gov Website. This site will enable you to easily find and apply for grant opportunities from most Federal grant-making agencies. You can also obtain information on types of govt grants and the agencies that give them. Additionally, you can sign up to receive notification of future opportunities.

You can also take a look at the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA), which contains a listing of various Government grants and other types of financial assistance. Here you can get information on funding by type, program area and eligibility, specific federal agencies, or you can search the Catalog by key words and other methods. If you find a grant that interests you, make sure that you carefully read the section on Eligibility Requirements to find out if you would be qualified to apply.

You should also be aware that most Government grants are not available year-round. That is, you can’t apply for most of them at any time you please — in general, you can apply for them only when they are announced by a federal agency. When an agency makes funds available for a grant, it places an announcement in the Federal Register which is published each weekday. Here’s where you can find Recent Grant Announcements (registration is free). In addition, you can search for announcements on Agency Websites.

Personal grants and grants for individuals are most often given for education (financial aid), the arts, and various types of scientific or other research, although some agencies award them to individuals for other purposes. You can find some information on individual and personal grants on my Frequently Asked QuestionsPage.

On my Business Grants Page, you’ll find information on U.S. government grants for for-profit companies, non-profit organizations, women, minorities and others,

Other excellent sources of information include:

 

  • Federal Funds Express. This is a website developed by the U.S. House of Representatives that includes topic areas and links to subjects such as Finding and Applying for Federal Grants, Funding From State and Local Governments, Educational Resources, Other Grant Types and Sources, and more.
  • Federal Grant Funding. Darrell Issa, the U.S. Congressman from California, provides links and information on various funding sources including some of those mentioned above.

Getting a grant is hard work. Don’t be fooled by websites that say you can get “free money” just by writing a letter or buying a book. Sites like those only exist to sell information that is already available at no cost.

You should be aware that there is a lot of competition for funding. To be successful in winning a grant, you must provide the funding agency with a well-written proposal which clearly states your objectives and sets forth a plan and budget for your activities. Grants are “free” in that you do not have to pay back the money. However, if you are awarded a grant you may be required to provide periodic progress, program evaluation, and/or financial reports to the funding agency.

If you think that you qualify for a grant, be prepared to work for it or contract with a competent professional to assist you.

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